Edgar Wright: '3D sounds like a f&!*ing headache'

Don't sugar the pill there, Edgar

TODO alt text

Film writer-director turned interactive comic scribe Edgar Wright isn't convinced by 3D yet, telling TechRadar that it sounds like a bit of a pain in the, er, head.

We caught up with Wright to talk about his interactive HTML5 IE9-sponsored comic Brandon Generator but managed to sneak in a couple of off-topic questions to keep him on his toes, like why didn't he film Scott Pilgrim vs the World in 3D?

"There are bits of Scott Pilgrim that would look good in 3D, but it's also too fast cut," he said. It's a fair point - with those fast cuts, ADHD shots and non-stop colour-overload, a 3D Scott Pilgrim could have left cinema owners with more than just husks of popcorn to clear up after screenings.

Bread makes you fat?

"I think 3D works well with particular things," he continued. "It works very well with animation but there are only a handful of live action films that have really benefited.

"I think that's why there's been a bit of a mixed response to it. I'd say 70 per cent of the time people have paid, I don't know, £5 extra, gone to see something and then forgotten it was in 3D by the end of it and gone, 'Well, what was the point of that? Why did I pay another £5 to see Harry Potter in 3D when it would have been perfectly fine in 2D?'

"So I think when 3D films really work, they've got to be really designed with 3D in mind. And that's why something like Avatar or Hugo works better, because they design the shots with that in mind."

So is that something that he's interested in working on? Not exactly...

"Sounds like a f***ing headache," he said. The missing letters there are l, i, and, er, double-p, if anyone's mum is reading.

"Maybe if it was the right idea. I'd never say never – if it was something that really lended itself to it then yeah."

Prepare to die obviously

Wright wrote Brandon Generator working with Marvel comic artist Tommy Lee Edwards. The resulting comic, has a noir-ish animated style, although it's more of a series of key frames without the transitions between them.

He also worked on the script for the motion-capture extravaganza that was Tintin – so is a full-on Edgar Wright animation on the cards?

"I was very very impressed by Tintin and what Spielberg and Jackson did, but I'm also aware that it was like a five year project so it's a lotta work. There's a lot of hours that go into that. So... maybe.

"I'll figure it out when I've got five years to spare."