Another EU regulator says Google's data collection breaks the law

The Dutch are sick of Google's shenanigans

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Google's controversial data collection practices have earned it scrutiny from yet another European privacy organization, the Dutch Data Protection Authority.

The DPA has accused Google of spinning an "invisible web of our personal data without our consent," which it says is definitely illegal.

Further, the group said Google's efforts to keep users informed about the data it "collects and combines" are insufficient.

The DPA will determine what to do about it at an upcoming hearing.

Dogpile on Google

Google has faced various degrees of ire from groups across the European Union since it updated its privacy policy in early 2012.

Google sought to unify its many disparate privacy policies into one single policy, but that left it far too vague for authorities to overlook.

In October 2012, the French data protection commission known as CNIL told Google that it had to unravel that unified privacy policy to cover its many and varied services and products.

Later, in July 2013, the UK's Information Commissioner's Office used the authority of the EU to order Google to rewrite its privacy policy within two months or face legal ramifications.

Google has fought tooth and nail, but after a seven-month investigation the Dutch DPA determined this week that whatever actions the search company has taken haven't been enough.

Another country's authorities jumping on the Google dogpile might not have that much of an effect on the company itself, but it does make it clear that the EU is not going to drop this issue easily.

Via Engadget