Cook: Just because Android is bigger, doesn't mean it's winning

"Winning has never been about building the most"

Cook  Just because Android is bigger  doesn t mean it s winning

Apple CEO Tim Cook stills believes his Cupertino-based firm is on top in the smartphone and tablet war, even though Android commands a larger market share.

Cook opened up about Apple's competition during AllThingsD's annual conference, and he still firmly believes that it's still the number one player in the technology market.

"For us, winning has never been about building the most.

"Arguably, we make the best PC, but we don't make the most. Same with the MP3 player. However, with the tablet, we make the best and most. With phones we make the best, but not the most."

Those are some pretty bold claims and the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S4, HTC One, Sony Xperia Z and Nokia Lumia 920 probably won't agree that the iPhone 5 is the best smartphone on the market.

iPad has "changed the game"

According to Cook, iPad users are far more engaged when it comes to tablet usage compared to Android based rivals.

"We look at usage: what customers are doing. A study said there were twice as many e-commerce transactions on iPad than on all Android devices combined during Black Friday last year.

"What the numbers suggest over and over again are that people are using our products more.

"My own iPad personal use is a significant percentage of my computing work. It has changed the game. I don't hear that from Android tablet users."

People love us!

But don't just take Cook's word for it, apparently Apple products are the most loved among consumers too.

"Customer satisfaction is sort of the report card no matter the business: iPad and iPhone have the highest customer satisfaction in tablets and phones.

"We want customers of all ages… we try to appeal to everyone."

Although once again, those are actually Cook's words, and he's probably got reason to be a little bit biased towards his own company - and he needs to do some defending as critics claim the firm is starting to go in the opposite direction in its post-Jobs era.

Via 9to5Mac